Viewers last month

sabato 22 novembre 2014

GOSSIP - Lilly-Put! L'indimenticata interprete di Kate in "Lost" scrive libri per bambini, si veste con orripilante gonna-tovaglia pronta al pic-nic e finisce sulla cover di "Fashion" (sicuramente diretta da miopi allo sbando)!

Evangeline Lilly goes for quite a bold look while arriving to sign copies of her new book “The Squickerwonkers” at the Barnes & Noble Tribeca on Monday (November 17) in New York City.
The 35-year-old The Hobbit actress put on a farm inspired look to promote her children’s book, which hits shelves tomorrow. Be sure to purchase your copy!
Evangeline is also on the cover of the Winter 2014 issue of Fashion magazine and chatted about plastic surgery in Hollywood.
“I think women in Hollywood who don’t do Botox and plastic surgery are revered, I revere them…My plan is to never go there. I’m too vain to get plastic surgery because I don’t like how it looks, and I want to look my best,” Evangeline said.

venerdì 21 novembre 2014

PICCOLO GRANDE SCHERMO - Guess...Who! La strana coppia: Matt Smith+Natalie Dormer in "Patient Zero"!

News tratta da Deadline.com
Matt Smith will star in Screen Gems’ Patient Zero opposite Natalie Dormer. Stefan Ruzowitzky is directing the Mike Le-scripted action thriller and Vincent Newman is producing.
In Patient Zero, an unprecedented global pandemic of a super strain of rabies has resulted in the evolution of a new species driven by violence. An inexplicably immune human survivor with the ability to communicate with this new species must spearhead a hunt for Patient Zero in order to find a cure to save his infected wife and humanity.
Best known for starring in the BBC series Doctor Who, Smith has stepped it up on the feature front. He stars in Screen Gems’ production Pride And Prejudice And Zombies, as well as Paramount and Skydance’s Terminator: Genisys. Smith most recently played a key supporting role in Ryan Gosling’s directorial debut Lost River opposite Christina Hendricks, Saoirse Ronan and Eva Mendes.
Dormer has been building feature credits that include The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Parts 1 & 2, Rush and Captain America: The First Avenger. She is best known for playing Margaery Tyrell, as queen on HBO’s Game Of Thrones.
L'EDICOLA DI LOU - Stralci, cover e commenti sui telefilm dai media italiani e stranieri

giovedì 20 novembre 2014

NEWS - Epocale: Nielsen misurerà gli ascolti di Netflix e Amazon dal prossimo mese!

Articolo tratto dal "Wall Street Journal"
Even as Netflix Inc. and other streaming-video providers have expanded to reach 40% of American homes, they have largely remained black boxes. They have refused to share data on how many viewers watch TV shows on their services, and there has been little independent data.
Next month, that will change, when Nielsen begins measuring viewership of TV on subscription online video services for the first time, according to Nielsen client documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.
The new measurement capability, which Nielsen meters can deliver without the assent of services like Netflix and Amazon.com ’s Prime Instant Video, will analyze the audio components of the program to identify which shows are being streamed. (Nielsen is still working on a way to measure subscription-video viewing on mobile devices, where such technology won’t work.)
The effort is designed to help content owners learn more about the impact of licensing their programs to these streaming players. Big media companies have been generating revenue growth by selling Netflix and Amazon streaming rights to their TV shows, but some are worried that in the long run they could hurt their viewership on traditional, ad-supported television, where they still make the vast majority of their money.
“Our clients will be able to look at their programs and understand: Is putting content on Netflix impacting the viewership on linear and traditional VOD [video on demand]?” said Brian Fuhrer, a a senior vice president at Nielsen.
Netflix and Amazon declined to comment.
The data could ripple through Hollywood, changing the power dynamics in the negotiations between streaming sites and TV studios that license them content.
Currently, the streaming sites have outsize leverage when deals come up for renewal, since only they know how much a show was viewed. The information also will likely help talent in their negotiations with studios.
The Nielsen documents also contain some of the strongest data to date suggesting that time spent on these streaming services is meaningfully eating into traditional television viewing. Television viewing is down 7% for the month ended Oct. 27 from a year earlier among adults 18 to 49, a demographic that advertisers pay a premium to reach.
Meanwhile, subscribership to streaming video services has jumped to 40% of households in September, up from 34% in January, Nielsen found. That is a rate of growth that advertising agency executives who saw the Nielsen document said they found shocking. Netflix accounts for the vast majority of the viewership.
After people sign up for streaming video services, they watch less TV than they used to, Nielsen found: 20% less, in the 18-34 demographic, and 19% less in 25-54.
The report also found that people who are video subscribers, on the whole, watch less TV than nonsubscribers: 20% less, among 18 to 49-year-olds.
“There is a certain indication that as you acquire (subscription online video), your television use, in terms of traditional television use, is going down,” said Dounia Turrill, Nielsen’s senior vice president, client insights. But she said that overall video usage is increasing and that more data are needed to draw definitive conclusions.
As television viewership dropped 8% in the 18-49 demographic in the third quarter, media executives stuck to their regular script—largely playing down the notion that Netflix and other streaming services are sucking away viewers.
The media executives say they aren’t getting full credit from Nielsen for consumption of their content on digital platforms. And they say Nielsen’s decision to count broadband-only homes in its measurement sample accounts for part of the decline in ratings. Philippe Dauman , chief executive of Viacom Inc., which owns Comedy Central and MTV, last week said existing measurement services had “not caught up to the marketplace.” Viacom has experienced double-digit ratings declines at its major networks, including Nickelodeon.
Mr. Dauman cited industry data from comScore, Diffusion Group and Nielsen, showing that the number of minutes of TV shows consumed on subscription video platforms represented just 2% to 3% of the total number of minutes consumed on traditional TV channels.
Todd Juenger, an analyst at Sanford Bernstein, believes that increased streaming video consumption is the greatest driver of television’s audience declines—and that those viewers aren’t coming back. He says media companies are injuring themselves when they license their content to companies like Netflix, pocketing the profits in the short term, but feeding a beast that will devour them in the long term.
“You are taking viewers out of the ad-supported universe and putting them into the non-ad-supported universe,” he said. “I don’t see how that’s good for the economic health of the content industry.”
At the moment, Hulu—which has a free, ad-supported version—is the only one of the three biggest streaming video players that works with Nielsen to have its audience measured, and only on desktop computers, according to a person familiar with the matter.
The new measurement service starting next month will cover Netflix and Amazon, even though they aren’t actively participating. Netflix has said in the past that it doesn’t need to release its viewership data since it doesn’t sell advertising.
In the beginning, companies will be able to view program ratings only for their own content. But as the tool ramps up, clients will likely be able to subscribe to syndicated viewership data to see ratings of their competitors, just as they do now with traditional TV ratings, Mr. Fuhrer said.

mercoledì 19 novembre 2014

GOSSIP - Il Cosby-gate s'allarga! L'ex modella Janice Dickinson esce allo scoperto in video accusando l'ex Robinson di molestie

Janice Dickinson has made some shocking claims against Bill Cosby and says that the comedian drugged her and sexually assaulted her back in 1982. The 59-year-old model and reality star says that she was summoned to Lake Tahoe by Bill to talk about her professional future and she remembers being given a pill and some red wine in her hotel room before blacking out and being raped. “The next morning I woke up, and I wasn’t wearing my pajamas, and I remember before I passed out that I had been sexually assaulted by this man,” Janice said in an interview with Entertainment Tonight. “Before I woke up in the morning, the last thing I remember was Bill Cosby in a patchwork robe, dropping his robe and getting on top of me.”
“I’m doing this because it’s the right thing to do, and it happened to me, and this is the true story,” she added.
Janice‘s allegations come just days after Mr. Cosby was accused of rape by several women.

IL VIDEO DELLA CONFESSIONE:

martedì 18 novembre 2014

NEWS - Clamoroso al Cibali! "Sons of Anarchy" sotto accusa dal Parents Television Council (il Moige Usa): "l'ultima puntata è stata pornografia pura" (tutti i protagonisti impegnati in atti sessuali espliciti di varia natura)

News tratta da "Entertainment Weekly"
What, can’t a basic cable drama have nearly three-minute long graphic sex montage showing nearly every major member of its cast engaged in all sorts of lusty hardcore acts?
Apparently not without angering a certain parents group.
The Parents Television Council is unloading on FX’s Sons of Anarchy, which opened last Tuesday’s episode with a series of sex scenes. The sequence rather effectively illustrated the widely varying range emotional states and romantic relationships of the main characters—while also serving up a hearty eyeful of Charlie Hunnam’s bare butt.
The scene featured six couples indulging in various acts (and one character giving herself solo pleasure) and was dubbed “the f–ktage” by show insiders.
“It’s official: In order to watch cable news, ESPN, Disney or the History Channel, every family in America must now also pay for pornography on FX,” said PTC president Tim Winter. “Last week’s episode of Sons of Anarchy opened with the most sexually explicit content we’ve ever seen on basic cable, content normally found on premium subscription networks like HBO or Showtime … If FX wants to be like HBO and air this kind of explicit content, then they should become a premium network … Families should not be forced to underwrite pornography. Cable Choice is a solution whose time has come, and there could hardly be a better example of it than this.”
FX declined to comment and show creator Kurt Sutter had no immediate comment. It’s worth noting that the series airs at 10 p.m. and FX runs a TV-MA advisory warning before the show and after every commercial break.
The PTC has decried a wide range of TV subjects, from the decidedly silly (protesting Adult Swim for making cartoons for adults, and MTV for what Nicki Minaj might do at the VMAs) to the arguably valid (inaccurate content ratings; ABC segueing from a Charlie Brown special into a Scandal sex scene).
The organization previously targeted SOA last year, when the show had a sequence involving a school shooting. At the time, Sutter responded: “The PTC—I would imagine these are not evil people, but they’re just not very intelligent or intuitive people. … The fact that these people want to be monitoring what my children watch is terrifying … whenever that stuff crosses the line into censorship, it’s just scary, not just on a creative level but on a personal level.”
L'EDICOLA DI LOU - Stralci, cover e commenti sui telefilm dai media italiani e stranieri

LA REPUBBLICA
Rai, Mediaset e Sky: la sfida si fa serial aspettando Netflix
"Per la televisione in crisi l’ultimo business è la fiction. Sparito il cinema di genere, sono Gomorra, Romanzo criminale, Don Matteo, Montalbano, House of cards a dominare sul piccolo schermo. Nella sola stagione 2014-2015 la fiction supererà sulle reti generaliste le 6mila ore di programmazione: un mercato enorme, nel quale si muovono pochi produttori che si contendono ascolti e incassi in una battaglia che è la vera nuova frontiera della televisione. C hi vince comanda e in cassa fa il pieno, orientando anche le strategie delle reti. I padroni del mercato Nel mondo i primi tre produttori di serie sono Endemol (colosso acquisito da Murdoch dopo l’uscita di Mediaset nel 2012, con 80 società operative in 26 Paesi del mondo, con circa 1,4 miliardi di euro di fatturato) Fremantle Media (che fattura circa 1,7 miliardi di euro) e Zodiak (con un catalogo di 20mila ore, oltre 600 milioni di euro di ricavi prodotti nel 2013). Senza dimenticare Hbo (sigla di Home Box Office), di proprietà della Time Warner una delle emittenti tv via cavo più popolari degli Stati Uniti, con oltre 32 milioni di abbonati con un fatturato di 1,3 miliardi di dollari. Tra le serie d’autore I Soprano, Girls, Veep, Boardwalk Empire. E il fenomeno Netflix, servizio online di contenuti in streaming che ha realizzato uno dei prodotti migliori dell’anno, House of cards e il rivoluzionario Orange Is The New Black. Presieduta da Reed Hastings, ha visto crescere il fatturato a 4,4 miliardi di dollari. La La produzione di fiction italiana vale intorno ai 300 milioni di euro.
Una torta che in Rai si spartiscono cinque società esterne, le cosiddette «cinque sorelle», che assorbivano parte consistente del bilancio della tv pubblica per fornitura di contenuti. Ai primi tre posti: la Lux Vide, la Fremantle Media e la Publispei. La fiction salva la tv generalista, ma non è stata risparmiata dalla crisi: nel 2008 Rai e Mediaset investivano oltre 500 milioni di euro, che si sono ora ridotti a 300, ma l’industria dell’audiovisivo resta un business importante con i suoi 70mila addetti. Dei 300 milioni si può valutare che circa 220 vadano alla produzione indipendente. Infatti, mentre la Rai investe solo su società indipendenti, Mediaset opera prevalentemente attraverso società di sua totale o parziale proprietà. Le produzioni italiane hanno un problema di costi e di risorse. Il costo medio orario della fiction generalista alta è al di sotto del milione. Sono le tv, acquisendone quasi in toto i diritti che finanziano la maggior parte, mentre la quota che si recupera dal mercato internazionale è inferiore al 10%.
Il volume di investimento di Sky non è dell’ordine di grandezza di quello di Rai e Mediaset. Le generaliste richiedono attori noti e costosi; Sky può invece puntare su attori bravi ma meno conosciuti. Però, facendo parte di un grande gruppo internazionale, può contare su una percentuale di ricavi esteri molto più elevata. Per Romanzo criminale è stata del 30%; per Gomorra del 35% circa; per Zero zero zero si prevede oltre il 60%. Un futuro targato Netflix. I giovani usano il computer, il palinsesto è «su misura». Netflix, il servizio che sta rivoluzionando la tv, forte di 60 milioni di abbonati nel mondo, dovrebbe sbarcare in Italia alla fine del 2015. House of cards con Kevin Spacey è la prima serie distribuita superando il concetto di palinsesto: 13 episodi messi online lasciando agli abbonati la scelta su come vederli. «Credo che sia il cambiamento più profondo» ha spiegato Ted Sarandos, 48 anni, presidente per i contenuti alla Netflix. «Chi scrive per noi sa che dovrà scrivere una cosa più simile a un film di 13 ore». Ma la vera rivoluzione è nell’organizzazione e nel sistema di selezione delle storie su cui puntare. Spiega Sarandos: «È molto meno rischioso produrre così che realizzare 50-70 piloti all’anno - in gran parte buttati - come fanno i network». Il budget annuale per i contenuti è di 2 miliardi di dollari, il 10% dei quali destinato alla programmazione originale. Basteranno una decina di euro per avere a disposizione tutte le serie sul proprio televisore o sul tablet. Finora le tv italiane sono rimaste al riparo da Netflix per il ritardo della rete a banda larga italiana: senza una buona connessione Internet, infatti, la qualità dello streaming si riduce. Ma questo ritardo ha dato la possibilità ai concorrenti italiani di guadagnare tempo. «Siamo tranquillissimi» risponde Andrea Scrosati, executive vice president programming di Sky Italia «la nostra offerta in streaming già esiste, naturalmente i diversi operatori si differenzieranno per il prezzo ma soprattutto per i contenuti. Le serie italiane sono motivo di orgoglio: Gomorra è stata venduta in 105 paesi, stiamo producendo la serie di Paolo Sorrentino sul Papa. Il pubblico vuole la qualità».
«L’arrivo di Netflix - ribatte Lorenzo Mieli, ad di Fremantle Media Italia - è favorito dal lavoro immenso che ha fatto Sky in questi anni: lo spostamento dal cinema alla televisione non riguarda solo la tv, è un fenomeno gigantesco. Ci sono società che hanno fatto solo cinema e che si stanno riconvertendo, è un mercato enorme, in crescita. Netflix ha un modello di business tutto suo: acquisice il 100% dei diritti ma paga il producer fee, una tariffa molto alta rispetto all’Italia. Potrà essere possibile fare fiction italianissime che viaggiano nel mondo». Le strategie. «Quanto serve la fiction al Paese e quanto aiuta a forgiare un’identità? » si chiede Marco Follini, presidente dell’Apt, l’associazione dei produttori televisivi. «L’industria va difesa ma c’è ancora molto da fare. Dal momento in cui la Rai esprime interesse per un progetto al contratto esecutivo passano mesi. Questa catena burocratica deve essere accorciata. L’aver aperto alla possibilità di presentare progetti online mi sembra una misura di trasparenza apprezzabile. Ma si deve intervenire anche sul trattamento dei diritti, oggi penalizzante: contestiamo la cessione in perpetuo e vanno tutelati i margini di autonomia e indipendenza delle produzioni esterne». Se migliaia di turisti italiani e stranieri hanno scoperto la Sicilia grazie a Montalbano e si moltiplicano le gite in Umbria per ripercorrere le strade di Don Matteo, le varie Film Commission dalla Puglia al Piemonte al Trentino Alto Adige, lavorano per promuovere il territorio attraverso la fiction. «È un circolo virtuoso» spiega Eleonora «Tinny» Andreatta, capo di Raifiction, 200 milioni di euro di budget (400 ore di fiction e più di 100 ore di cartoon). «Cerchiamo di differenziare l’offerta spiega - per parlare a molti pubblici. Abbiamo sostenuto la politica del girare in Italia, per valorizzare il nostro territorio. I soldi spesi nella produzione italiana tornano moltiplicati al Paese. Grazie al tax credit l’Italia può diventare un centro di produzione internazionale. Ora puntiamo anche sul Web: “Braccialetti rossi” insegna che l’attività dei social network funziona e il Web riporta il pubblico giovane davanti alla tv». Antonino Antonucci Ferrara, a capo della fiction di Mediaset, fa i conti coi tagli: «Abbiamo soldi per fare un centinaio di serate. Rispetto agli americani non c’è discussione, lì oltre alla genialità degli autori c’è una spesa per il prodotto che supera i 5 milioni di dollari a puntata. Abbiamo abbassato i costi, i budget non sono più quelli di una volta. Ma è un momento buono per la creatività, puntando sui giovani sceneggiatori e coinvolgendo i produttori di cinema». Gli investimenti di fiction di Rai e Mediaset dal 2008 a oggi: la crisi ha colpito l’industria. Nel 2014 il budget si attesta sui 300 milioni. La fiction italiana è soprattutto legata alle produzioni più popolari, non stupisce quindi che a guidare la classifica dei titoli più visti siano tutte produzioni di RaiUno. In testa la serie interpretata da Terence Hill". (Silvia Fumarola, 17.11.2014)

lunedì 17 novembre 2014

domenica 16 novembre 2014

GOSSIP - Claire Danes su "Glamour" UK a tutto photoshop con t-shirt dei Def Leppard: "mio marito Hugh Dancy degno di 'Downton Abbey"!
Claire Danes flashes her beautiful smile on the cover of Glamour UK‘s December 2014 issue.
Here is what the 35-year-old Homeland actress had to share with the mag:
On her infamous cry face on Homeland: “I’ve never been terribly preoccupied with how I look performing. Certainly Carrie is not defined by her attractiveness.”
On her husband Hugh Dancy: “He is a gentleman. Downton Abbey-esque? I guess. He was raised well, went to great schools, he’s a clever guy and he makes me giggle… I scored. I lucked out, big-time! But when you’re truly intimate with somebody, they tend to lose their physical shape, you see through them. Occasionally I’ll wake up and notice his… form. And I’ll be, ‘Oh, wow. Dude. Is a looker.’ Then I get shy, all over again. It’s not why I love him, but it’s a very nice bonus.
On not working with Damian Lewis anymore: “I miss acting with Damian, first and foremost. He is an extraordinarily gifted performer. I also miss his friendship, he’s a very bright, funny chap, who adores his wife and kids. It’s rare to find someone equally as talented as he is kind and sane.”
For more from Claire, visit GlamourMagazine.co.uk!

"Il trivial game + divertente dell'anno" (Lucca Comics)

"Il trivial game + divertente dell'anno" (Lucca Comics)
Il GIOCO DEI TELEFILM di Leopoldo Damerini e Fabrizio Margaria, nei migliori negozi di giocattoli: un viaggio lungo 750 domande divise per epoche e difficoltà. Sfida i tuoi amici/parenti/partner/amanti e diventa Telefilm Master. Disegni originali by Silver. Regolamento di Luca Borsa. E' un gioco Ghenos Games. http://www.facebook.com/GiocoDeiTelefilm. https://twitter.com/GiocoTelefilm

Lick it or Leave it!

Lick it or Leave it!